Mindset by Carol Dweck - Stylo à bille

Mindset by Carol Dweck

Mindset by Carol Dweck

by styleabille , July 8, 2019

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Back in 2010, I used to give lectures at a francophone renowned university in Beirut. In one of my lectures, just before the final term, a close friend of mine inspired me. I wanted to motivate my students. I was keen that they all succeed. The varying levels of success did not matter. What mattered for me were two things: that they succeed, and that they progress in comparison to the previous mid-term.

I asked them two consecutive questions.

“My friend is on a wheelchair. Do you think he can drive?”

Most answers were negative. I went on and asked.

“My friend actually drives. Do you know how?”

The set of answers I received to the latter question was completely different. There were actually answers to my question.

When I read “Mindset” in 2018, I recalled this instance in my class. To get the gist of this fascinating book, I recommend that you watch this TedTalk. If I were to decide, I would have named this talk: Not Yet.

What this book is about

The author, Carol Dweck, is one of those people I do not want to meet in person. I am afraid to get disappointed if I do as I sincerely look up to what she has achieved professionally. She is regarded as one of the world’s top researchers in psychology.

Dweck has conducted decades of research. This resulted in a groundbreaking finding: the power of  mindset.

This book talks about success and how it is influenced by the way we perceive our own abilities. This is a book that is relevant to schools, work, sports, arts, politics, and others.

Carol coined the idea that a fixed mindset is one that believes that competencies are fixed. As such, they do not advance. In contrast, she speaks about growth mindset. Those people around us who trust their abilities, who seek continuous betterment, and who believe that we can develop and improve.

In this book, the author shares insights into this concept as both an individual matter and a societal and corporate matter.

Benjamin Barber, an eminent sociologist, once said, “I don’t divide the world into the weak and the strong, or the successes and the failures… I divide the world into the learners and non-learners.

What I liked about this book 

Read this passage

“Yes, Edison was a genius. But he was not always one. His biographer, Paul Israel, sifting through all the available information, thinks he was more or less a regular boy of his time and place. …What eventually set him apart was his mindset and drive…”

This book is made simple. I like it primarily because it proves how one can motivate the people you lead, love, teach, and overall influence.

This book is comprehensive. Research and stories tap into personal growth and success, parenting, teaching and coaching, business and leadership, and relationships.

What I liked is all the information I found as I read this book. I felt enlightened. Check this infographic if you are a visual person.

I urge you not to beat yourself up. We tend to do so especially women. This book equips you with a dose of confidence as it unleashes myths about ability and achievement. If you are a lone brilliant person, read this book.

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